Legend

Places in Britain associated with legends, or legendary people; or a story – a British legend – often a traditional one, that may or may not be true!

St David’s Head

St David's Head, wild ponies, Pembrokeshire

Everywhere in Britain, we walk in the footsteps of the past; it’s just not always that obvious.  However, a relatively short, lung-bursting, stagger up to St David’s Head (Penmaen Dewi) in Pembrokeshire will take you to a reminder of a 5th century saint, the remains of an Iron Age settlement and field systems, a feature […]

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On Hallowe’en

Origins of Halloween

The local supermarket is pretending to be the props department for “Night of the Living Dead”.  There are plastic skulls, axes, hairy hands, spiders, broomsticks, masks more gruesome than many of the weekend shoppers in the Trafford Centre – and even life-size ravens with glowing red eyes.  Also, a plastic fish skeleton – the relevance

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Durham Cathedral

Durham Cathedral, near Framwellgate Bridge

Durham’s story is a fascinating piece of the story of England.  It is partly a tale of saints and kings and moving bones, and it begins back in the 7th century. The founding of Durham Cathedral Actually, it was mostly Cuthbert’s fault – with some help from the Danes, a lost cow and perhaps a

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Shugborough

Shugborough Hall, Staffordshire (rear view)

A complete working historic estate of 900 acres in rural Staffordshire, Shugborough has everything an aristocratic country pile should have – imposing Georgian mansion, parkland, formal gardens, a walled garden, farm (including labourers’ houses, watermill, workshops and rare breeds), river walks, monuments, servants’ quarters, stables, a brewery…enough to please most day trippers, and even keep

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St Ninian’s Chapel

St Ninians Chapel on the Isle of Whithorn

We thought we should go to the Cradle of Christianity in Scotland; the place where St Ninian, Scotland’s first Christian missionary, landed in 397AD and showed the pagan Picts The Way.  There is a chapel there, near the Saint’s alleged landing place on the Isle of Whithorn, at the south-east corner of the Machars Peninsula

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Ely Cathedral

Ely Cathedral, Cambridgeshire - 'the Ship of the Fens'.

Before England existed, the lonely Isle of Ely lay in the territory of the Gyrwas.  Around the year 652AD, Tondbert, a prince of the South Gyrwas, married the Princess Etheldreda, a descendent of the mighty Wuffingas who had united the North-folk with the South-folk.  Tondbert died and Etheldreda, whose father was Anna (or Onna), King

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Visit the Tower of London

Tower of London

The Tower of London has been sitting on the north bank of the Thames, watching the tides of a great city ebb and flow, for around a thousand years.  The city has grown up around it and it is part of it; it is impossible to imagine London without the Tower.  Think of all that

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In search of Robin Hood

Robin Hood is one of England’s enduring legendary heroes.  Deprived of his rightful inheritance and outlawed, Robert of Locksley (or Loxley) shelters in the King’s forest of Sherwood, where he assumes natural leadership over the vagabonds and other outlaws in hiding there, all victims of medieval England’s harsh laws and brutal penalties for infringement.  Robert

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The London Stone

London Stone, Cannon Street

Every now and again, you come across a reference to ‘The London Stone’.  Not ‘a London stone’; The London Stone.  Use of the definite article tells you right away that this is Something Quite Important.  Never heard of it?  Tut-tut.  To be honest, I worked in and around London for years and was completely unaware

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