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Britain, places to visit, attractions, heritageThis is the place to search for places and things of interest to visit in Britain, by name, location, type, keyword – or just have a browse.  It is a growing directory – 700+ entries as of October 2019.  Most entries have links for further information.

London

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Museum of LONDON DOCKLANDS

The Museum of London Docklands (part of the Museum of London) tells the story (surprisingly) of London’s docks, how trade developed, the involvement of slavery, the time when London was the hub of a great empire and the world’s busiest port. You can also walk through 19th century ‘sailortown’.

Region:
Location/Address: No 1 Warehouse
West India Quay
County: London
Post Code: E14 4AL
Main Historic Period: Victorian
Useful Website Address: Museum of London website
Tip/Nearby: Canary Wharf
Primary Management: Local Authority
Strawberry Thief

The William Morris Gallery is housed in William Morris’ childhood home, a Georgian house set in Lloyd Park in Walthamstow. It contains the world’s largest collection of this iconic Victorian designer and craftsman’s work, including tapestries, furniture, tiles, wallpaper, embroidery and paintings. The museum was opened in 1950 by the then Prime Minister, Clement Attlee.

Region:
Location/Address: Lloyd Park
Forest Road
Walthamstow
County: London
Post Code: E17 4PP
Main Historic Period: Victorian
Useful Website Address: William Morris Gallery website
Primary Management: Other
Ragged School Museum

You’ll find the Ragged School Museum in a group of three canalside former warehouse buildings which were once the largest “ragged” or free school in London. Copperfield Road Free School was established by the London missionary and philanthropist Dr Bernado in 1877. It provided a basic education to tens of thousands of children until it closed in 1908. The museum includes several galleries, an authentic Victorian classroom where you can sit at a desk and experience a lesson, and an East End Kitchen from the 1900s, demonstrating what life would have been like in a simple, one-room home with no electricity or running water.

Somehow, Copperfield Road seems an appropriate address; Twist Lane might have been better.

Photo credit Gordon Joly via flickr

Region:
Location/Address: 46-50 Copperfield Road
Mile End
County: London
Post Code: E3 4RR
Main Historic Period: Victorian
Useful Website Address: Ragged School Museum website
Tip/Nearby: Mile End Park
Primary Management: Other
CHRISTCHURCH GREYFRIARS

A tranquil city garden on the site of the former 13th century Franciscan church of Greyfriars. It was the burial place of four queens and was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666. A replacement church, designed by Christopher Wren, was destroyed by bombing in 1940, though the west tower still stands.

Region:
Location/Address: King Edward Street
County: London
Post Code: EC1A 7BA
Main Historic Period: Modern
Link to featured article: The ghosts of Christ Church Greyfriars
Tip/Nearby: St Pauls
Primary Management: Local Authority
Postman's Park

Postman's Park opened in 1880 on the site of the former churchyard and burial ground of St Botolph's Aldersgate. It was popular with workers from the old General Post Office nearby - hence its name - and is home to the unusual Watts Memorial to Heroic Self-Sacrifice. G F Watts (1817-1904) was a painter and philanthropist who proposed a park commemorating 'heroic men and women' who had given their lives attempting to save others. The result is an installation at the park consisting of glazed tablets containing bare information about dramatic acts in which ordinary people - men, women and children - perished trying to save others.

Region:
Location/Address: King Edward Street
County: London
Post Code: EC1A 7BT
Main Historic Period: Edwardian
Useful Website Address: City of London website page
Tip/Nearby: St Paul's tube station
Primary Management: Local Authority
Golden Boy of Pye Corner

The Golden Boy at Pye Corner is a carved wooden figure covered in gold on the corner wall of a building at the junction of Giltspur Street with Cock Lane. As it says below, the statue "was erected to commemorate the staying of the Great Fire which beginning at Pudding Lane was ascribed to the Sin of Gluttony when not attributed to the papists as on the Monument and the Boy was made prodigiously fat to enforce the moral he was originally built into the front of a public-house called the Fortune of War which used to occupy this site and was pulled down in 1910."

Region:
Location/Address: Giltspur Street
County: London
Post Code: EC1A 9DD
Main Historic Period: Stuart
Tip/Nearby: Smithfield Market, Old Bailey
Primary Management: Unknown
St BARTHOLOMEW the GREAT

The Priory Church of St Bartholomew the Great claims to be the oldest surviving church building in London. It was established as an Augustinian priory and hospital in 1123 by Rahere, a courtier of Henry I's, who saw the light. Hence the foundation of St Bart's Hospital - which adjoins the church. The Priory was dissolved in 1539 and the nave demolished - but the magnificent remains still serve as a parish church. Somehow, Rahere's tomb survived. Part of the cloisters also survive - now used as a cafe. This is a working parish church. It has nevertheless featured in numerous TV and film productions.

Region:
Location/Address: West Smithfield
County: London
Post Code: EC1A 9DS
Main Historic Period: Medieval
Tip/Nearby: Smithfield - site of fairs and executions, now a meat market. Various memorials nearby, including to William Wallace.
Primary Management: Church authorities
WALLACE MEMORIAL, Smithfield

Memorial to Scottish hero Sir William Wallace, who was executed nearby in 1305. The memorial was set up in 1956.

Post code is approximate - memorial is on the wall of St Bart's Hospital.

Region:
Location/Address: West Smithfield
County: London
Post Code: EC1A 9DS
Main Historic Period: Medieval
Link to featured article: Wallace Memorial, Smithfield
Tip/Nearby: Priory Church of St Bartholomew the Great, Smithfield Market
JOHN WESLEY’S HOUSE and the MUSEUM of METHODISM

John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, built a small town house here in 1778, along with the chapel next door. Wesley lived in the house for the last eleven winters of his life, when not touring to visit and preach to his Methodist societies round the country. The house is open to the public and contains many of John Wesley's belongings. The Chapel is also open - though not on Sundays - and there is a museum in the crypt that contains many fascinating objects - including (apparently) John Wesley's death mask and hair...

Region:
Location/Address: 49 City Road
County: London
Post Code: EC1Y 1AU
Main Historic Period: Georgian
Useful Website Address: Museum of Methodism website
Tip/Nearby: Bunhill Fields Burial Ground is opposite
Primary Management: Church authorities
BUNHILL FIELDS Burial Ground

Bunhill Fields is a former burial ground established in the 17th century (though with a longer history than that) and the last resting place for an estimated 123,000 bodies. It is particularly known for its nonconformist connections. Among those commemorated here are William Blake, Daniel Defoe, John Bunyan and Susannah Wesley (John Wesley's mum). The burial area is fenced in, and crowded; there is an open area, primarily used by office workers at lunch times.

Region:
Location/Address: 38 City Road
County: London
Post Code: EC1Y 2BG
Main Historic Period: Georgian
Link to featured article: The bodies at Bunhill
Useful Website Address: City of London website page
Tip/Nearby: John Wesley's House and Museum, Quaker Gardens
Primary Management: Local Authority
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