Public buildings

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ALDEBURGH MOOT HALL

A lovely Tudor town hall, dating from c1550, and a symbol of Aldeburgh's prosperity at the time. The ground floor would have been occupied by shops, with meetings taking place on the first floor. Greatly restored in Victorian times, it now houses a good local museum. The building would once have been more at the centre of town - now it is close to the beach, an indication of shoreline erosion in this part of the UK.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
Market Cross
Aldeburgh
County
Suffolk
Post Code
IP15 5DS
Main Historic Period
Tudor
Useful Website Address
Tip/Nearby
Aldrebugh town, Thorpeness, Orford
Primary Management
Local Authority
Atlantic Bridge

This is the Bridge over the Atlantic, also known as the Atlantic Bridge; I daresay someone’s referred to it as Atlantic Crossing too. You’ll find it in Argyll, about 10 miles south of Oban. Atlantic Bridge’s real name is Clachan Bridge and it joins the Hebridean island of Seil with the mainland, spanning what is technically a section of the Atlantic Ocean, albeit a very narrow one. We Brits are known for our sense of humour; just look at how we still agree to pay our politicians.  The bridge was designed by Robert Mylne (1733-1811) – who also designed Blackfriars Bridge in London - and was built in 1792.

Nearby on the island side is the Tigh an Truish Inn - the house of trousers. The name allegedly comes from the time after the 1745 rebellion, when the Government banned the kilt. So islanders travelling to the mainland for work would change into trousers at the inn before crossing the bridge, and back into traditional plaid when returning home.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
Clachan
Seil
County
Argyll
Post Code
PA34 4TJ
Main Historic Period
Georgian
Link to featured article
Useful Website Address
Tip/Nearby
Slate Islands and Heritage Centre. Oban 10 miles to the north.
Primary Management
Historic Scotland
BATTLE of STIRLING BRIDGE

The battle was fought on 11 September 1297.  Following Scots support for the French, Edward I of England invaded Scotland, deposed the King, John Balliol and left an army of occupation. Sir William Wallace and Sir Andrew Moray led a rebellion and met an English army outside Stirling. The English advanced over a narrow bridge over the River Forth. The Scots fell upon the English from the high ground on Abbey Craig, cutting the invading army in two. The English commander, the Earl of Surrey, could not reinforce because of the narrowness of the bridge. The portion of his forces that had crossed the bridge were cut down, though some of managed to escape by swimming back across the river. The Scottish victory destroyed the myth of English invincibility.  Legend has it that the hated English treasurer, Hugh de Cressingham, was flayed after the battle and that Wallace made a belt from the skin.

The actual bridge of the battle was destroyed at the time. The current 'old' bridge was built downstream of it in the 16th century and is still in use by pedestrians. There is a plaque on the east end of the bridge, with a small portion of meadow adjacent, but it is thought that most of the fighting took place on ground that is now built over. It's a nice bridge, though. Post code is very approximate.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
Bridgehaugh Road
Stirling
County
Stirlingshire
Post Code
FK9 5AL
Main Historic Period
Medieval
Tip/Nearby
Stirling Castle, Wallace Monument
BLAKENEY GUILDHALL

Flint-covered remains of a 15th century merchant's house, with a fine brick-vaulted undercroft. It later became the guildhall for local fish merchants. Worth seeing if you're in town; it's just by the quayside.

English Heritage property managed by Blakeney Parish Council.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
Back Lane
Blakeney
County
Norfolk
Post Code
NR25 7NA
Main Historic Period
Tudor
Tip/Nearby
Binham Priory, Castle Acre, visit the seals off Blakeney Point.
Primary Management
Local Authority
Brig o' Doon

The Brig o' Doon is a beautiful old cobbled bridge over the River Doon, built in the 15th century. It features in the 1791 poem, 'Tam o' Shanter', when Tam gallops across the bridge on his horse, Meg, pursued by witches and warlocks. He escapes - but they grab Meg's tail! Combine with a visit to the Robert Burns' Monument, Museum, Alloway Old Kirk and his birthplace.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
Alloway
County
Ayrshire
Post Code
KA7 4PQ
Main Historic Period
Medieval
Useful Website Address
Tip/Nearby
Robert Burns' Monument, Museum, Alloway Old Kirk and the cottage he was born in are all within walking distance.
Primary Management
National Trust for Scotland
British Library

The British Library receives a copy of every publication produced in the UK and Ireland. In addition to books (including early printed books), the collection includes manuscripts, maps, newspapers, magazines, prints , drawings, music scores, patents, sound recordings and stamps. Particular treasures include Magna Carta, the Lindisfarne Gospels, Leonardo da Vinci's notebook, the first edition of The Times from 18 March 1788 and Beatles manuscripts. As well as being open for research, the Library holds free exhibitions and events.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
96 Euston Road
County
London
Post Code
NW1 2DB
Main Historic Period
Modern
Useful Website Address
Tip/Nearby
Wellcome Collection, British Museum, King's Cross
Primary Management
HM Government
CLIFTON Suspension Bridge

The Clifton Suspension Bridge high over the craggy Avon gorge in Bristol is a marvel of Victorian engineering, originally designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, and took 33 years to build. It was completed in 1864 and, at the time, was the longest and highest span attempted - 702 feet (214m) across and 245 feet (75m) above high tide. It operates as a toll bridge for motor vehicles, but is free for pedestrians. There is a free visitor centre. The bridge is owned and managed by the Clifton Suspension Bridge Trust.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
Bridge Rd
Leigh Woods
Bristol
County
Avon
Post Code
BS8 3PA
Main Historic Period
Victorian
Useful Website Address
Tip/Nearby
Clifton village, gorge walk, Bristol Zoo and other city centre attractions.
Primary Management
Other
Devil's Bridge, Kirkby Lonsdale, Cumbria

Kirkby Lonsdale’s Devil’s Bridge is a medieval structure with three graceful arches and is a scheduled ancient monument. It was replaced by Stanley Bridge as the main bridge carrying traffic over the River Lune along the main road (A65) between Kendal and Skipton in 1932 and is now a favourite with visitors – and weekend motorcyclists.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
Off the A65 or walk from Town Centre
Kirkby Lonsdale
County
Cumbria
Post Code
LA6 2DF
Main Historic Period
Medieval
Link to featured article
Tip/Nearby
Kirkby Lonsdale, Yorkshire Dales
Primary Management
Local Authority
FORTH BRIDGE

The Forth Bridge is a railway bridge that spans the Firth of Forth in the east of Scotland. It was the world’s first major steel structure when it was opened by the then Prince of Wales on 4 March 1890 and is still the world’s longest cantilever bridge. When it opened, it provided an unbroken railway line between London and Aberdeen. It took 7 years to build, employing more than 4,000 men at the peak of its construction, and 57 lives were lost building it. It is 8,904 feet (2,467 metres) long and stands 361 feet (110 metres) above the water at high tide. It requires 52,793 gallons (240,000 litres) of paint.

Two hundred trains use the Forth Bridge each day carrying 3 million passengers a year. In 2015, it was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

You cannot visit the Forth Bridge but there are viewpoints at South Queensferry.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
South Queensferry
Edinburgh
County
West Lothian
Post Code
EH30 9QU
Main Historic Period
Victorian
Useful Website Address
Tip/Nearby
Edinburgh
Primary Management
HM Government
GUILDHALL, Worcester

Worcester’s current Guildhall is an impressive Queen Anne style building, completed in 1723.  It is home to the Council Chamber, the City’s former Court Rooms and the Mayor’s Parlour and an impressive and imposing Assembly Room, described by King George III as "a handsome gallery" when he visited in August 1788. Praise indeed (George was obviously not prone to excessive enthusiasm).  Statues of King Charles I and King Charles II were erected either side of the main entrance, lest anyone doubt Worcester’s Royal allegiance, and above is a statue of Queen Anne.  The building is open to the public – though check before visiting because some rooms may not be open.  The City’s tourist information office is also located in Worcester's Guildhall and has its own entrance, on the left.

Region/Nation
Location/Address
High Street
Worcester
County
Worcestershire
Post Code
WR1 2EY
Main Historic Period
Stuart
Useful Website Address
Tip/Nearby
Walking distance of Cathedral and river
Primary Management
Local Authority

This is a growing listings directory – over 950 entries have been listed as of September 2022. 

Entries have links for further information, such as opening times and entry fees.

If your favourite attraction is not listed yet, and you have a good quality digital photograph of it that you are able to freely send, please get in touch

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