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Villages

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ASHBY ST LEDGERS

Very small, attractive, village between Daventry and Rugby. The Jacobean manor was owned by the Catesby family and the gatehouse is famous for being the place where the Gunpowder Plot was planned (neither the gatehouse nor the manor is open to the public). There is a wonderful medieval church, dedicated to St Leodegarius, a pub (the Olde Coach House) and a series of estate workers' cottages designed by Lutyens.

NB Warning notice that village website may be hacked, hence the link has not been included here.

Northamptonshire
CV23 8UN
All
Terror plot planned in peaceful village
Off the A361 between Kilsby and Daventry
Local Authority
BOSHAM

Bosham is a small, attractive, village on the side of an inlet in Chichester Harbour and beloved of yachtspeople. It is an ancient place, and apparently the (contested) location for King Cnut's encounter with the waves. There is a lovely church, a craft centre, tea shops and a couple of nice pubs.

Situated off the A259 between Chichester and Emsworth.

Near Chichester
West Sussex
PO18 8HX
Georgian
Bosham, Cnut, the king's daughter and Harold
Bosham village website
Chichester. The foreshore gets flooded at high tide - best not leave your car there.
Local Authority
CHIDING STONE

Block of smooth sandstone which allegedly (but probably not) gives the village of Chiddingstone its name and which has a mysterious past. One story is that it was used as a place of judgement in ancient times - hence 'chiding stone'. The village is a peach - most of the buildings are owned by the National Trust and are over 200 years old.

Chiddingstone is located on a minor road between Edenbridge and Tonbridge; the River Eden flows just to the north.

Chiddingstone
Nr Edenbridge
Kent
TN8 7AH
Prehistory
Chiddingstone's Chiding Stone
Chiddingstone Castle, Penshurst Place, Hever Castle
National Trust
DENT

Dent is an attractive village of cobbled streets in beautiful rural Dentdale, on the western edge of the Yorkshire Dales. It has a history of self-contained independence, with roots possibly in an ancient Celtic Pennine kingdom ruled by a warrior king, Dunawt, from whom Dent gets its name. It is a farming community, though Dent Brewery (based in nearby Cowgill) is famous - its products are sold in the village's two pubs. Dent is also known for 'the terrible knitters of Dent' and as the birthplace of geologist Adam Sedgwick (1785-1873). An annual music and beer festival is held in June. There's a 12th century church and an interesting heritage centre and museum.

Cumbria
LA10
All
The Vampire of Dent (and other stories)
Dentdale website
Dent Railway Station is the highest in England.
Local Authority
EYAM

Derbyshire village made famous for putting itself into voluntary quarantine when the Plague arrived. Also Eyam Hall (NT), church and other attractions - though the story of the plague inevitably predominates.

Eyam, Hope Valley
Derbyshire
S32
All
Eyam, 1665
Eyam Museum
Local Authority
LACOCK

Lacock is one of those places that are almost frozen in another time. In this small picture-perfect Wiltshire village of about 350 souls, there are few overt trappings of the 21st century: no satellite dishes or TV aerials, no yellow lines, and only a small amount of signage – which anyway appears to be easily removable. Blank out the cars and rough-up the road surface a little and you’re transported back to the past, albeit a sanitised version where every building is immaculately maintained. Which explains why Lacock is one of the UK’s premier locations for filming period dramas, like Pride and Prejudice and Cranford. The village is owned by the National Trust.

Lacock
Nr Chippenham
Wiltshire
SN15 2LG
N/A
Lacock
National Trust details on Lacock
Lacock Abbey and the Fox Talbot Museum
National Trust
PORTMEIRION

Portmeirion is a fantasy village in North Wales created by architect Clough Williams-Ellis from 1925-1976. It has no other purpose than as a place of enjoyment, where you can just wander about, have something to eat, attend an event, or stay. There is an Italian feel to the village, which has mostly been constructed from scratch but which also includes structures moved from other locations. It was made famous as the setting for the 1960s TV series, 'The Prisoner'.

Note - dogs are not welcome, except guide dogs.  Children are allowed in, though.

Minffordd
Penrhyndeudraeth
Gwynedd
LL48 6ET
Modern
Portmeirion
Portmeirion's website
Porthmadog, Snowdonia
Independent
SALTAIRE

Saltaire is a Victorian model village, built by textile magnate Titus Salt. The name is a combination of 'Salt' with 'Aire', the local river. Salt gave his workers considerably better living and working conditions than they had endured in Bradford, after he moved production to his new facility in 1853. Saltaire today is a living village, with shops, a park, canal side walks, all part of a World Heritage Site. The main feature is the old factory building, Salts Mill, which includes exhibitions, specialist retail outlets and a permanent gallery exhibiting the works of local Bradford artist, David Hockney.

Victoria Road
Saltaire
West Yorkshire
BD18 3LA
Victorian
Saltaire village website
Bradford
Local Authority
TYNEHAM

Probably Dorset's most famous lost village, frozen in time.  In 1943, the villagers were ordered to leave their homes so that the area could be used for training; they never returned.  Only empty buildings remain, plus the preserved school and church, offering a fascinating insight into life in isolated communities in the first half of the 20th century, together with an evocative air of sadness.

Check opening times carefully - the area is still used for military training.

Minor road between East Lulworth and Kimmeridge
Dorset
BH20
Modern
Fortunes of war
Lulworth Cove, Corfe, Wareham.
Military
WHARRAM PERCY Deserted Medieval Village

Famous and fascinating deserted medieval village, occupied for at least 600 years before being abandoned in the 16th century. There is not much to see except the ruined church and the outlines of houses and streets, but it's an intriguing place and there are some good information boards.

Use a map.  It is a walk of about 3/4 mile over an uneven path through farmland from a car park off the B1248 - can be muddy.

Free entry.  Absolutely no facilties whatsoever.

SW of Wharram-le-Street
North Yorkshire
YO17 9TN
Medieval
Not far from Malton
English Heritage