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Memorials

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ADAM SMITH, statue

Bronze sculpture, by Alexander Stoddart, of the Scottish economist and philosopher Adam Smith (1723-1790), who is probably best known as the author of 'Wealth of Nations'. The statue was unveiled in 2008.

The post code is for St Giles' Cathedral.

Outside St Giles' Cathedral
The Royal Mile
Edinburgh
Lothian
EH1 1RE
Modern
St Giles' Cathedral
Local Authority
ALFRED MEMORIAL, Athelney

Victorian memorial on the site of the abbey, founded by King Alfred in 888, on the site of his refuge from the Danes on the Isle of Athelney.

Field near Athelney Farm
Cuts Road
Athelney
Somerset
TA7 0SD
Victorian
Burrow Mump is just down the road. Muchelney Abbey isn't far.
Unknown
BATTLE of BANNOCKBURN

The Battle of Bannockburn took place over the 23rd and 24th June 1314 between the Scots, under Robert the Bruce, and a significantly larger army under Edward II of England. The English were under siege by the Scots at Stirling Castle and Edward's army was intended to relieve the siege. Instead, Bruce inflicted a massive defeat. This ultimately led to the Declaration of Arbroath in 1320.

Much of the probable site of the battle is now built over. However, the National Trust for Scotland operates a visitor centre that offers a hi-tech battle experience (ticket only), a shop and a cafe. There is memorial to the battle on the site as well as a statue of Robert the Bruce. Note - there is no museum or exhibition.

Glasgow Road
Whins of Milton
Stirling
Stirlingshire
FK7 0LJ
Medieval
NTS' Battle of Bannockburn website
Stirling Castle, Wallace Monument
National Trust for Scotland
BATTLE of ROSLIN

Memorial to the Battle of Roslin, erected in 1994. The battle was fought on 24th February 1303 between the Scots and English during the Wars of Scottish Independence. It was a Scottish victory, but it does not figure in many history books and few people have even heard of it. Some accounts of the battle suggest that a divided force of 30,000 English troops was picked off in 3 separate engagements by a rapidly assembled Scottish army of 8,000 fighting on terrain they knew. However, evidence is lacking and the above story may be a myth; the battle could have been a skirmish, or series of skirmishes.

Nr Dryden Cottages
Roslin
Midlothian
EH25 9PP
Medieval
Stay at Rosslyn Castle
Rosslyn Chapel and Castle
Unknown
BATTLE of STAMFORD BRIDGE

A significant battle fought here on 25th September 1066, between King Harold's Saxon-English army and an invading force of Norsemen under Harald Hardrada and Tostig Godwinson. The English victory was emphatic, but Harold then had to march south to meet the invading Normans at Hastings. There is not much to see in the village, thought there is a memorial in the centre.

Stamford Bridge
North Yorkshire
YO41 1QE
Viking
Stamford Bridge - the other battle in 1066
Local Authority
BILLY FURY statue

Memorial statue by Tom Murphy to Billy Fury, born Ronald Wycherley in 1940, died 1983, and one of the top pop stars of the early 1960s. The statue was unveiled in 2003 and is close to the Piermaster's House - address approximate.

Albert Parade
Albert Dock
Liverpool
Merseyside
L3 4BB
Modern
Website for the Billy Fury fan club
Tate Liverpool, Maritime Museum, Beatles Experience
Local Authority
BUNHILL FIELDS Burial Ground

Bunhill Fields is a former burial ground established in the 17th century (though with a longer history than that) and the last resting place for an estimated 120,000 bodies. It is particularly known for its nonconformist connections. Among those commemorated here are William Blake, Daniel Defoe, John Bunyan and Susannah Wesley (John Wesley's mum). The burial area is fenced in, and crowded; there is an open area, primarily used by office workers at lunch times.

38 City Road
London
EC1Y 2BG
Georgian
City of London website page
John Wesley's House and Museum, Quaker Gardens
Local Authority
BURROW MUMP

A natural hill rising out of the Somerset levels, with the ruins of a church, St Michael's, on top, giving the place an evocative feel. There was probably a castle on the site once. Burrow Mump also has possible associations with King Alfred, who hid in the marshes around nearby Athelney to escape the Danes.  It is now a war memorial, dedicated to all those from Somerset who died in the First and Second World Wars.

Post Code is for the nearby King Alfred pub. Small free car park at the foot of the hill.

A361
Burrowbridge
Somerset
TA7 0RB
Georgian
Willow and Wetland Visitor Centre. Glastonbury and Wells aren't far.
National Trust
CAEDMON’S CROSS

A memorial erected in 1898 to England's first known poet, the Anglo-Saxon Caedmon. He has a nice story. The memorial is in the churchyard of St Mary's church, at the top of the steps leading up from the town.

The photo is of Whitby Harbour. See the featured article for more details.

Abbey Plain
East Cliff
Whitby
North Yorkshire
YO22 4JT
Saxon
Give us a song, Caedmon
Whitby Abbey, St Mary's Church
Church authorities
CALTON HILL

Calton Hill, at the east end of Edinburgh City, is a landmark that is included within the boundary of Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site. It is home to a number of monuments, not least the unfinished National Monument and the Dugald Stewart Monument and is used for casual strolling as well as celebratory events. There are panoramic views from the top.

Edinburgh
Lothian
EH7 5AA
Georgian
A postcard from Calton Hill
Edinburgh City Observatory, Holyrood
Local Authority