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Britain, places to visit, attractions, heritageThis is the place to search for places and things of interest to visit in Britain, by name, location, type, keyword – or just have a browse.  It is a growing directory – 700+ entries as of October 2019.  Most entries have links for further information.

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SALTAIRE

Saltaire is a Victorian model village, built by textile magnate Titus Salt. The name is a combination of 'Salt' with 'Aire', the local river. Salt gave his workers considerably better living and working conditions than they had endured in Bradford, after he moved production to his new facility in 1853. Saltaire today is a living village, with shops, a park, canal side walks, all part of a World Heritage Site. The main feature is the old factory building, Salts Mill, which includes exhibitions, specialist retail outlets and a permanent gallery exhibiting the works of local Bradford artist, David Hockney.

Location/Address: Victoria Road
Saltaire
County: West Yorkshire
Post Code: BD18 3LA
Main Historic Period: Victorian
Useful Website Address: Saltaire village website
Tip/Nearby: Bradford
Primary Management: Local Authority
Top Withens

Top Withens has long been thought of as the inspiration for the Wuthering Heights that Emily Bronte describes in her eponymous novel of 1847. Originally "Top of the Withens", Top Withens (or Withins) is a ruined farm thought to date from the second half of the 16th century. It was last inhabited in the 1920s, has been disused since the 1930s and is now completely ruined. In fact, ruined structures pepper the landscape all around. It is actually generally believed that the building Emily Brontë described bore no resemblance to Top Withens whatsoever; but, as a plaque placed on the wall by the Brontë Society says, “the situation may have been in her mind when she wrote of the moorland setting of the heights.” You can walk to Top Withens from a variety of directions and along the Pennine Way. The post code directs you to the village of Stanbury, from which there is a relatively easy path.

Location/Address: Stanbury
Near Haworth
County: West Yorkshire
Post Code: BD22 0AB
Main Historic Period: Georgian
Link to featured article: Our Bronte Tour Begins In Haworth
Tip/Nearby: Bronte Falls, Pennine Way
Primary Management: Local Authority
BOSHAM

Bosham is a small, attractive, village on the side of an inlet in Chichester Harbour and beloved of yachtspeople. It is an ancient place, and apparently the (contested) location for King Cnut's encounter with the waves. There is a lovely church, a craft centre, tea shops and a couple of nice pubs.

Situated off the A259 between Chichester and Emsworth.

Region:
Location/Address: Near Chichester
County: West Sussex
Post Code: PO18 8HX
Main Historic Period: Georgian
Link to featured article: Bosham, Cnut, the king's daughter and Harold
Useful Website Address: Bosham village website
Tip/Nearby: Chichester. The foreshore gets flooded at high tide - best not leave your car there.
Primary Management: Local Authority
Bramber Castle

There isn't much left of Bramber Castle - a few sections of curtain wall, the remains of a tower, an overgrown motte, ditch, bits of masonry and an enormous section of gatehouse wall. It was built by the Norman, William de Braose, in 1073 to help control the locality and stayed in the family's hands for about 200 years. Bramber was still in use in the 15th century, but fell into disrepair and was in ruins by the time of the Civil War. Next door is St Nicholas' Church - which was originally the castle's chapel and is a little gem. The location is just on the edge of Bramber village.

Region:
Location/Address: Castle Lane
Bramber
Steyning
County: West Sussex
Post Code: BN44 3NW
Main Historic Period: Norman
Tip/Nearby: Cissbury Ring, Brighton
Primary Management: English Heritage
Chanctonbury Ring

Chanctonbury Ring is an Iron Age hillfort, constructed c6-400BC, though actually in use since Neolithic times. It was probably not a fort, nor ever occupied, but more likely a religious site or, possibly, animal enclosure. 2 Romano-British temples have been found on the hill (they are not visible). In 1760, Charles Goring of nearby Wiston House planted a ring of beech trees around the hill; these, or their descendents, are still there. The hill was used by the army during WW2. There are several other prehistoric sites nearby. Chanctonbury also has a number of legends associated with it - most notably variations of the story that the Devil appears if running seven times anti-clockwise (or backwards) round the hill, alleged links with witchcraft (young ladies sleeping out on the hill are more likely to conceive), UFOs as well as suggestions that the hill is haunted and claims that spending the night on it is an unpleasant experience.  Nonetheless, there are great views from the top.

Region:
Location/Address: Chanctonbury Ring Rd
Steyning
County: West Sussex
Post Code: BN44 3DR
Main Historic Period: Prehistory
Tip/Nearby: Cissbury Ring
Primary Management: National Park
CHICHESTER CATHEDRAL

The roots of Chichester Cathedral lie in its now vanished predecessor at Church Norton, ten miles away on Selsey Bill, which is said to have been founded by St Wilfred in 681AD. The see was transferred to Chichester, once an important Roman town, in 1075. A new cathedral was built and consecrated in 1108. From the late 13th century it became a centre of pilgrimage as the site of the shrine of St Richard of Chichester, who was bishop from 1245 to 1253. His shrine, along with much else, was destroyed during the Reformation in 1538 and the Cathedral suffered damage again, at the hands of Parliamentary forces in 1642, during the Civil War. The Cathedral was considerably restored in the Victorian period. Its many treasures include its soaring spire, unique free-standing medieval bell-tower, rare 12th century sculptures and notable modern artwork items, including a window by Marc Chagall. Burials include the composer Gustav Holst and the 13th century 10th Earl of Arundel, Richard FitzAlan and his wife, Eleanor of Lancaster; their effigies are holding hands.

Region:
Location/Address: West Street, Chichester
County: West Sussex
Post Code: PO19 1RP
Main Historic Period: Medieval
Useful Website Address: Chichester Cathedral website
Tip/Nearby: Fishbourne Roman Palace, Weald and Downland Museum, Bosham
Primary Management: Church authorities
Cissbury Ring

Cissbury Ring is the largest hillfort in Sussex, covering an area of c60 acres. Flint has been mined there since Neolithic times, open mining giving way to the digging of numerous shafts and tunnels. It was used as a burial ground in the Bronze Age and was fortified in the Iron Age, in around 400 BC. It is a univallate fort - one with a single rampart and ditch. The fort was in use for about 300 years, was abandoned, and then resettled in the late Roman period - possibly in defence against Saxon raids. It was fortified again during WW2, when an anti-tank ditch was dug round it, an AA battery based there and, during the run up to D-Day, the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders were camped there. Now, it's just a pleasant place to walk, with great views over the Downs and nearby coast. If you're lucky, you may spot some wild ponies grazing there.

Location/Address: Nr Findon
County: West Sussex
Post Code: BN14 0HT
Main Historic Period: Prehistory
Tip/Nearby: Chanctonbury Ring, Bramber Castle
Primary Management: National Trust
HOLY TRINITY, Bosham

Bosham is the oldest Christian site in Sussex and is mentioned by Bede, but settlement in the area probably goes back to at least Roman times. The oldest part of Holy Trinity, Bosham, is Saxon - the church is featured in the Bayeux Tapestry - with Norman and later medieval additions. A notable feature of the church is a grave, thought to be that one of King Cnut's daughters, who drowned in a nearby millstream. There is also speculation that Harold, last king of the Saxon English, was buried in the church after the Battle of Hastings.

Region:
Location/Address: High Street
Bosham
Nr Chichester
County: West Sussex
Post Code: PO18 8LY
Main Historic Period: Medieval
Link to featured article: Bosham, Cnut, the king's daughter and Harold
Useful Website Address: Holy Trinity, Bosham's, website
Tip/Nearby: Weald & Downland Open Air Museum, Fishbourne Roman Palace
Primary Management: Church authorities
NOVIUM MUSEUM

A local museum that includes, among other things, Chichester's Roman bath house, Racton Man - the skeleton of a Bronze Age warrior discovered nearby and a small artwork collection. It also hosts special exhibitions - check the website to see what's on.

Region:
Location/Address: Tower Street
Chichester
County: West Sussex
Post Code: PO19 1QH
Main Historic Period: All
Useful Website Address: The Novium's website
Tip/Nearby: Chichester Cathedral, Fishbourne Roman Palace
Primary Management: Local Authority
Ouse Valley Viaduct

The Ouse Valley Viaduct, aka the Balcombe Viaduct, is a photographer's dream. It isn't just its size - just under 1,500 feet long and about 100 high (450 x 29m), or the elegance of 37 brick arches stretching across the Sussex countryside, but the design. The arches are symmetrical and create an artistic tunnel - quite extraordinary. It is built of 11 million bricks, originally from Holland, but has been repaired so often with different bricks that it's now a kind of brick patchwork. Completed in 1842, it is a remarkable Victorian structure and carries more than 100 trains a day between London and Brighton. There's a small lay-by on Borde Hill Lane, between Balcombe and Haywards Heath, large enough for 2 or 3 cars. Take boots if it's wet.

Region:
Location/Address: Borde Hill Lane
Balcombe
County: West Sussex
Post Code: RH17 6QP
Main Historic Period: Victorian
Tip/Nearby: Wakehurst Place, Nymans
Primary Management: Other
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